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Lesson 66
Vocabulary Practice 10: Calendar


We’ll be looking at more vocabulary than usual this lesson. We’re going to cover two related lists of words: days of the week and months of the year.

Vocabulary: Days of the Week

Monday

Henesháal: East Day

Tuesday

Honesháal: West Day

Wednesday

Hunesháal: North Day

Thursday

Hanesháal: South Day

Friday

Rayilesháal: Above Day

Saturday

Yilesháal: Below Day

Sunday

Hathamesháal: Center Day

Vocabulary: Months

January

Anede: One Month

Alel: Seaweed Month

February

Ashin: Two Month

Ayáanin: Tree Month

March

Aboó: Three Month

Ahesh: Grass Month

April

Abin: Four Month

Athil: Vine Month

May

Ashan: Five Month

Amahina: Flower Month

June

Abath: Six Month

Athesh: Herb Month

July

Ahum: Seven Month

Ameda: Vegetable Month

August

Anib: Eight Month

Adalatham: Berry Month

September

Abud: Nine Month

Ahede: Grain Month

October

Athab: Ten Month

Ayu: Fruit Month

November

Anedethab: Eleven Month

Athon: Seed Month

December

Ashinethab: Twelve Month

Adol: Root Month


When Suzette Haden Elgin first formed Láadan words for the months of the year, she naturally chose poetic forms that conformed to the growing season. Regrettably, the growing season she chose was that of the northern hemisphere, which is offset by six months from that in the southern hemisphere (eg, winter in the southern hemisphere begins in June rather than December in the north).

This did not sit well with the second generation working with Láadan, who felt that Láadan should not present a calendar that fails so dramatically to reflect the life experience of the speakers of such a large segment of the population of the planet. The second generation took the decision to use the words for the numbers (this scheme is not at all poetic, but is easy to understand—and is reminiscent of the English month names September through December, which reflect the Latin words for “seven” through “ten”.

We will not be using the poetic forms in these lessons, but you should be able to recognize them if you should happen upon them in older texts.

Additional Vocabulary

Germane to this topic, we already know “híyahath” (week), “hathóol” (month), “hathóoletham” (year), “wemen” (spring), “wuman” (summer), “wemon” (autumn/fall), and “weman” (winter). One new word we’re adding here:

hathemen

season (as in spring, summer, autumn, winter)

Examples

Bíi thi híyahath sháaleth um wi.

A week has seven days, obviously.

Bíi thi hathóoletham hathóoleth shinethab wi.

A year has twelve months, obviously.

Bíi methi hathóol nedebe sháaleth thabeboó wa.

Several months have thirty days.

Bíi methi hathóol menedebe sháaleth thabeboó i nede wa.

Many months have thirty-one days.

Bíi thi hathóol nede neda, Ayáanin, sháaleth e thabeshin i nib e thabeshin i bud wa.

Only one month, February, has either twenty-eight or twenty-nine days.

Bíi thi hathóoletham sháaleth e debeboó i thabebath i shan e debeboó i thabebath i bath wa.

A year has either three hundred sixty-five or three hundred sixty-six days.

Exercises

Translate the following into English

1

Béli aril éthe le beth nathoth Henesháaleya barada wa.

2

Báa eril meróo onida dalathameth thil nizhethode Anibeya eril?

3

Bíid benem duthahá shod bethosha nil Rayilesháaledim wa.

4

Bíi en obeth letho úwanú el le ódon belidesha yil Anedethabeya baradan wa.

5

Báa aril thi Anede Hathamesháal bim e shan hathóolethameya aril?

6

Bíidi meban with menedebe binith hin hinedim Ashinethabeya wi.

7

Báadi thoneth merumadoni Aboóya? Bíi em, hunesha; hanesha Abudeya wi.

8

Bíi aril sháad Leyaneshem Méri Yáabe Bo Líithisha raheb Yilesháaleya shin aril wáa.

9

Bíith eril loláad ril ulanin sháawithizh ezhubetheháa hishima Ashinede nede eril Abimedim wa.

10

Bé eril bel Shósho mewowíi woléeli menedebe habelid le yedehóoshaháadim Ashaneya wa.


Did you note, in #1, that the stative verb (in English, an adjective) “éthe” (be clean) would be understood to be an active verb (to clean) when supplied with an Object? The more formal form “dóhéthe” (cause to be clean; to clean) is another option.


Did you note, in #6, that the quantifier “menedebe”, while formally correct, is unnecessary? The information that “many” people give is amply represented by the duplicated pronoun “hin” (this/that, many) in the construction “hin hinedim” (to each other).

Translate the following into Láadan

11

Baker Margaret begins to work before sunrise every day except Tuesday.

12

Last Thursday, a bird flew alone above the forest that grew on the island.

13

The farm where the the wild animal sleeps is thriving this August.

14

[Angry] The unusually rude shopkeeper smirked at the child who loves tart fruit last Wednesday.

15

My suitcases will remain at the hotel until June.

16

Clergyman Matthew interpreted the big-and-little story for his many contented (no reason) students last winter.

17

During which month and season is the holiday?

18

Which is sooner: October or December?

19

Elizabeth will begin learning chefing (cookery science) in the autumn.

20

The young man who fell off my boat into the deep lake on Thursday shows trust (despite) toward me.

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Answers

1

[promise, lovingly] I shall clean your (beloved) home on Mondays.

2

Did the families harvest berries from your (honored you few) vines last August?

3

[angry] The healer is staying in her room until Friday.

4

My neighbor understands why I make cheese under the house every Novermber.

5

Will January have four or five Sundays next year?

6

[didact] Many people give gifts to each other in December [obviously].

7

[didact] Are seeds buried in March? Yes, in the north; in the south it’s in September [obviously].

8

Miss Mary Brown will go up White Mountain the Saturday after next.

9

[pain] The woman who is studying entomology felt sadness (Int,Ø,–) from last February to April.

10

I swear Magic Granny brought many jonquils to the valley where I live in May.

 

11

Bíi nahal Mázhareth Ebalá nasháaleya eril sháaleya woho rizh Honesháaleya wáa.

12

Bíi eril shumáad babí sholanenal náwí olinehóo marishaháasha rayil Hanesháaleya nede eril wa.

13

Bíi ril tháa ábed úshahú áana romid Ahumeya ril wa. —or— Bíi ril tháa áana romid ábedehóoshaháa Ahumeya ril wa.

14

Bíid eril lháada worashalehal wowehehá ril a háawith woyemehel woyutheháadim Hunesháaleya eril wa.

15

Bíi aril menáham imedim letho buthesha Abathedim wa.

16

Bíi eril déedan Wílem Wíitham wonóowid wodedideth mewoníina wobediháda menedebe wemaneya eril wáa.

17

Báa diídin bebáaya? Hathóol nedaba? Hathemen nedaba?

18

Bíi methoma Athad i Ashinethab; báa hesho bebáa?

19

Bíi aril nabedi Elízhabeth emahineth wemoneya wáa.

20

Bíi ril dam eril háda yáawithid esh lethode woruhob wowilidunedim Hanesháaleyaháa lehenath ledim wa.

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